A handy checklist that can help you with common situations.

Photo courtesy of Franklin Electric Co.


This article is provided through the courtesy of Franklin Electric Co. It is excerpted from Franklin Electric’s Application, Installation and Maintenance (AIM) Manual. This trouble-shooting guide covers the basic situations you may encounter, and lists possible causes, checking procedures and corrective actions. Some checking procedures are beyond the scope of this basic checklist, so we’ve provided the appropriate Web addresses to get you to those. Franklin’s Web site offers a wealth of valuable technical information; check it out at www.franklin-electric.com

Motor Does Not Start

No power or incorrect voltage. Check the voltage at line terminals. The voltage must be ±10 percent of rated voltage. Contact the power company if it is incorrect.

Fuses blown or circuit breakers tripped. Check fuses for the recommended size, and check for loose, dirty or corroded connections in fuse receptacle. Check for tripped circuit breakers. Replace with proper fuse or reset circuit breakers.

Defective pressure switch. Check the voltage at contact points. Improper contact of switch points can cause the voltage to be less than line voltage. Replace pressure switch or clean points.

Control box malfunction. This will require repair or replacement. For complete, detailed procedures, visit www.franklin-electric.com/Manual/ AIM_46.htm.

Defective wiring. Check for loose or corroded connections or defective wiring and correct any deficiencies.

Bound pump. Check for misalignment between the pump and motor or a sand bound pump. Amp readings will be three times to six times higher than normal until the overload trips. Pull the pump and correct the problem. Run the new installation until the water clears.

Defective cable or motor. This will require repair or replacement. For complete, detailed procedures, visit www.franklin-electric.com/Manual/AIM_44.htm.

Motor Starts Too Often

Pressure switch. Check the setting on the pressure switch and examine for defects. Reset the limit or replace the switch.

Check valve stuck open. A damaged or defective check valve will not hold pressure. Replace if defective.

Waterlogged tank. Check air charge, and repair or replace as appropriate.

Leak in system. Check the system for leaks, and replace damaged pipes or repair leaks.

Three-phase control panel. Photo courtesy of Franklin Electric Co.

Motor Runs Continuously

Pressure switch. Check the switch for welded contacts and check the switch adjustments. Clean contacts, replace switch or adjust setting.

Low water level in well. Pump may exceed the well’s capacity. Shut off the pump and wait for the well to recover. Check static and drawdown levels from wellhead. Throttle pump output or reset pump to lower level. Do not lower if sand may clog pump.

Leak in system. Check the system for leaks, and replace damaged pipes or repair leaks.

Worn pump. Symptoms of worn pump are similar to those of a drop pipe leak or low water level in the well. Reduce pressure switch setting. If the pump shuts off, worn parts may be the fault. Pull the pump and replace any worn parts.

Loose coupling or broken motor shaft. Check for a loose coupling or damaged shaft. Replace worn or damaged parts.

Pump screen blocked. Check for clogged intake screen. Clean the screen and reset pump depth.

Check valve stuck closed. Check operation of the check valve, and replace if defective.

Control box malfunction. This will require repair or replacement. For complete, detailed procedures, visit www.franklin-electric.com/Manual/ AIM_46.htm.

Motor Runs But Overload Protector Tips

Incorrect voltage. Using a voltmeter, check the line terminals. Voltage must be within ±10 percent of the rated voltage. Contact the power company if voltage is incorrect.

Overheated protectors. Direct sunlight or other heat sources can raise the control box’s temperature, causing protectors to trip. The box must not be hot to the touch. Shade the box, provide ventilation or move the box away from heat source(s).

Defective control box. This will require repair or replacement. For complete, detailed procedures, visit www.franklin-electric.com/ Manual/AIM_46.htm.

Defective motor or cable. This, too, will require repair or replacement. For complete, detailed procedures, visit www. franklin-electric.com/Manual/AIM_44.htm.

Worn pump or motor. You’ll need to replace the pump and/or motor. Procedures for checking the running current can be accessed at www.franklin-electric.com/Manual/AIM_13.htm, www.franklin-electric.com/Manual/AIM_22.htm, www.franklin-electric.com/Manual/AIM_24.htm and www.franklinelectric.com/Manual/AIM_26.htm.
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